Thursday, July 7, 2011

PEOPLE DON'T LIKE TO READ ART

I will have some sigil drawings in "PEOPLE DON'T LIKE TO READ ART" at Western Exhibitions in Chicago. Thanks to Scott Speh for including me in the exhibition. Information below.


Western Exhibitions will present the group show, “People Don’t Like to Read Art” in both Gallery 1 and 2, opening with a public reception on Saturday, July 9 from 6 to 9pm.

The title of the show takes its name from a 2009 drawing (not in this show) by Deb Sokolow that humorously reflects on some viewers’ aversion to reading text in visual art works. While the use of text in contemporary art is fairly commonplace, many of artists in this show move beyond the use of single words and phrases (though examples of this kind of work will be in the show) by working with paragraphs, lists, fully-formed narratives and book formats, asking viewers to take the time to actively read the work. 

The show includes works from several gallery artists: Nicholas Frank’s framed book pages from his ongoing biography, Adriane Herman’s vinyl appliqu├ęs of found to-do lists, John Parot’s paintings and drawings wryly reflecting on modern gay life, a currency collage from Mark Wagner, and narrative drawings by both Joe Hardesty and Deb Sokolow. 

Also included in this survey of works that incorporate the act of reading are several non-gallery artists who work in a variety of media, including painting, drawing, video, artists’ books, printmaking and collage, and hail from points in and outside of Chicago. We’ll be showing an artist book produced in collaboration with The Present Group from Rebecca Blakley (Oakland, CA); drawings and collages by Elijah Burgher (Chicago); sculpture by Simon Evans (Berlin); watercolors by Cat Glennon (Brooklyn); text drawings byMeg Hitchcock (New York); video and printmaking by Rachel Foster (San Francisco); drawings by David Leggett (Chicago); artist book/novel by Andy Moore (Chicago); collage/photos by Kirsten Stoltmann (Los Angeles); and artist books by Angie Waller (New York).